Burdock, Loose Leaf 1/4 lb
Item# Burdock
$7.99

Description

Burdock Root, Cut & Sifted, ORGANIC, 1/4 lb. package

Size: 1/4 lb

Botanical Name: Arctium lappa L.

Directions: To use as a tea, add 1 tsp. of herb to a tea infuser and place the infuser in a tea cup. Pour 1 cup of boiling water over the infuser. Cover and let steep for 3-5 minutes.

Product Notes: Inulin is the most abundant constituent of burdock, being present at up to 45% in the root. Other constituents include mucilage, a tiny bit of essential oil, tannins and a number of plant acids.

Origin: Bulgaria

Processing Notes: Burdock roots are very fibrous, resulting in soft, stringy, cottony type material when cut. This material looks like, and is often mistaken for mouse nesting in the final product. However, it is the innermost part of the root and contains the same constituents as the more woody outer pieces.

Organic: QAI Certified Organic

Kosher: KSA Certified

Supplement Facts
Serving Size 1 tsp
Servings About 3356
Amount per Serving 
Organic Burdock, cut (root)  1.4g*
* Daily Value not established.

Common Name: Burdock

Plant Part: Root

More Directions: To use as a tea, pour one cup of boiling water over one teaspoon of burdock root. Cover and let steep for 3 to 5 minutes. To make a decoction, add one teaspoon of burdock root to one cup of water, bring to a boil and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes. The flavor of the tea is considered pleasant and more palatable than other herbs with similar uses and therefore often the herb of choice for teens, children and picky adults.

Suggested Uses: Burdock roots are considered purifying, cleansing, cooling and tonifying to the body. They have a special affinity for the skin and are used both internally and externally for improving skin health. Burdock is often combined with yellow dock root, cleavers or red clover to make a tea or skin wash.

Caution/Safety: The Botanical Safety Handbook* classifies burdock root as:

Class:1 herbs which can be safely consumed when used appropriately.

*Michael McGuffin, ed., American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook, (New York: CRC Press, 1997)